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Event TV Gives You a Super Shot at Fast Consumer Insights


With the first weekend of NFL playoff games behind us, the Super Bowl picture is beginning to crystallize. And we can say with confidence that, whether the Feb. 4 game features a rematch of last year’s classic between the Patriots and Falcons, an all-Pennsylvania showdown between the Eagles and the Steelers, an appearance by the Minnesota Vikings as the first team to play a Super Bowl in its home stadium, or any of the other possible combinations, the day will bring a big win for pizza and chicken wings restaurants.


Domino’s reported that it sold more than 11 million slices on Super Sunday, 2017 – 4.5 times more than on a typical Sunday. That came to about one Domino’s slice for every ten viewers, based on Nielsen’s estimate of 111.3 million average viewers during the game.


Year-round, Domino’s and Papa John’s both generate more than 60% of their sales via digital orders, including their own apps, according to a Los Angeles Times report.


Before last year’s Super Bowl, Buffalo Wild Wings told Forbes that it expected per-store sales to more than double on game day, from an average of 6,000 wings to 13,500. Another chain, Buffalo Wings & Rings, went into the 2017 game projecting a near-doubling, from the typical 8,900 orders per day to 17,000 on Super Sunday.


– Average TV viewership for the Super Bowl telecast has ranged from 106.5 million to 114.4 million since 2010, when viewership first topped the 100 million mark.


In a 2012 study that apparently hasn’t been updated, the National Restaurant Assn. estimated that 12 million people would watch the Super Bowl in restaurants and bars.


An additional 1.7 million watched last year’s game on streaming devices.


It all adds up to a chance for brands and retailers catering to Super Bowl viewers to score big – not just in sales, but in consumer insights. But speed is of the essence, just as it is on the football field, if you’re going to defeat recall bias and get insights at a moment when consumers’ experiences and the emotions connected with them are fresh in mind. And on Super Bowl Sunday, just like every other day, the fastest way to get in touch with consumers is on the mobile devices they’ll have in hand or within arm’s reach while they’re watching the game.


Big television events – awards shows are another example – are big opportunities to reach a large, demographically representative group of the most relevant respondents naturally. In the Quick Serve Restaurant realm, game days and awards nights open doors to real-time responses illuminating consumer behaviors and opinions. For example:


 You can identify panelists who have your app, or a competitor’s, on an Android device, and shoot them a survey during or just after an event telecast to find out whether and how they used it – and with what degree of satisfaction and ease — while that experience is fresh in mind.


Advertisers can get early viewer opinions about how their high-dollar Super Bowl commercials were received.


Among respondents who state an intent to buy, you can trace them further along the path to purchase by sending a follow-up mobile survey a week or two after the game, to see if they have in fact bought the product they said they would. Expect an 85% follow-up response rate.


The main point about Big Event research opportunities is that surveys fielded through an advanced mobile app give you access to a large audience whose members already have a significant watching behavior in common. It’s a rare moment when so many consumers are doing the same thing. To have a productive conversation about how to leverage it for super brand insights via mobile, just get in touch by clicking here.