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Is 92 the Magic Number for Consumer Insights?

 

Number 92 blog image 4Oct17

 

What does hot-shot high school basketball player LaMelo Ball have to do with market research?

 

The Los Angeles area star scored 92 points in a game last season, the first time a high school baller had hit the 90-point mark since 2005. Basketball fans are waiting to see whether LaMelo will eventually outshine his older brother, Los Angeles Laker Lonzo Ball, who was the second player picked in the most recent NBA draft.

 

Ninety-two is also a magic number for marketers and insights professionals to remember. Flurry Analytics’ latest study of U.S. telecommunications usage found that the average American spends five hours a day using a mobile device – and that 92% of that usage takes place inside a mobile app, eclipsing the 8% of time spent accessing and creating content with a mobile browser. Meanwhile, Pew Research Center has reported that as of 2016, 92% of Americans ages 18 to 29 owned smartphones.

 

If you’re not persuaded by magical thinking and prefer to stick to commonsense logic, here are some fundamental truths to consider when putting together your playbook for obtaining the most representative and useful consumer insights: 

  • Consumer research needs to reach representative numbers and kinds of consumers.
  • Consumers have flocked to mobile (desktops and laptops get far less usage time than mobile). It’s where they literally represent themselves in the information universe, by downloading, uploading and sharing content. 
  • Recent GreenBook Research Industry Trends Reports (GRIT) have voiced the urgent need for market research to get mobile surveys right.
  • Mobile-app research is the way to achieve representation and engagement, because mobile apps are where average U.S. consumers can be found 4 hours and 36 minutes a day. As opposed to “mobile optimized” research (which actually should be called “mobile browser” research), which is trying to dig for insights in the sparsely inhabited online mobile zone where the average person spends just 24 minutes a day.

And here are a couple of bonus data points for basketball buffs:

  • Just two college basketball players over the past 35 seasons have made 92% of their free throws over the course of their NCAA careers – Blake Ahearn of Missouri State and Derek Raivio of Gonzaga, who both played from 2004 to 2007. Ahearn shot 94.57% from the line, and Raivio hit 92.7%
  • No NBA player has achieved a career free-throw average as high as 92%; only 21 players have ever made 92% or more of their free throws in a single season. Steve Nash has come the closest over the course of an entire career, averaging 90.43%. Stephen Curry, at 90.1%, is the only active player who’s above the 90% mark for career free-throw accuracy.

That’s our play by play for today. To wrap it up, the score is 92% to 8% in favor of Mobile App Research with a dedicated panel of app-using respondents. Which method  do you want to bet your next project on? For a productive conversation about mobile-app research, just get in touch at solutions@mfour.com.

 

For an entertaining video overview of mobile research, just click here. And to see how Anheuser-Busch used mobile geolocation studies to help launch a new brand, click here.