Tag Archives: native app

News | Blog | Events

1,000 Automotive Dealership Interviews, weekly!

Today, MFour Mobile Research announces its launch of Mobile Drivers – 1,000 weekly customer interviews conducted at more than 17,000 GeoValidated® automotive dealerships nationwide.

As you can see in the map below, over the last 7 days, we’ve conducted 1,012 interviews in dealerships across 34 states.

Current recall studies let respondents answer surveys up to six months after their visit.  By that time, memories have faded and researchers are getting a ‘memory biased’ perspective on customer experiences.

But our Surveys on the Go app push notifies our more than 600,000 active respondents that a survey is available any time they leave an automotive dealership around the United States.  Finally, you can hear from consumers as they leave the lot, at The Point-of-Emotion®about Purchase Intent, Brand Loyalty, Dealership Experience and more.  And because our Native App tracks respondents from dealer to dealer, you can also understand where they’re headed next.

Moreover, Mobile Drivers lets a respondent record audio, video and take pictures of their experience, which is reported to clients through SPSS, Excel or MFour’s Proprietary Moment-to-Moment® Reporting Platform.

Our interviews validate the fact that in-dealership studies provide faster responses, better insights and more accurate data then any other product on the market.  Click below and hear from actual respondents – one who purchased a new Hyundai and another who was looking for specific features, like a panoramic sunroof:
Hyundai Sonata
                                                                                              New Hyundai Sonata
Hyundai Santa Fe
                                                                                                Hyundai Santa Fe
We can interview by brand, by category, by type of driver and we can even add questions tailored to your needs within the omnibus portion of our weekly study.  If you would like more information or get a free issue of our Mobile Drivers Weekly Report shoot us an email or give us a call.  We would be happy to speak with you.
News | Blog | Events
Mobile Surveys

Mobile Surveys Uncover What Gamers Want

This study was a joint effort by Marketcast and MFour Mobile Research leveraging MFour’s mobile survey platform. The topic of study was what gamers expect (and want) from digital distribution.

Compared to around 2/3 of movies watched at home that are bought digitally, less than 1 in 5 console games purchased is a digital download. The majority are still bought via traditional physical discs.

Major publishers report that while their digital revenue is growing substantially, full game downloads make up a much smaller portion of this than subscriptions and add-on downloadable content.
4

Most coverage in the press focuses on the industry impact, and especially on the overall growth of digital revenue, of which game sales are still a small part. Instead, we decided to talk directly to gamers and find out how they feel about the digital shift in gaming compared to other forms of entertainment, and what they want from this shift.

5

Using MFour’s native app, Surveys On The Go, respondents were asked to use their front facing cameras to capture deeper insights. Here is what they had to say:

 

Current-generation console owners are more likely to be buying games digitally than previous-gen gamers, where only 2 in 5 gamers have bought a game digitally in the past year.

Gamers who subscribe to their console’s premium tier – Xbox Live Gold, PlayStation Plus – are also more likely to be buying games digitally than those who just belong to the free tier.

And gamers who play on both console and PC may be accustomed to downloading games on their computers via Steam, but being a regular Steam user doesn’t carry that download-know-how over to console usage; playing games on Steam has no impact on gamers’ willingness to download games on console.

78

Among HD console owners, men are a bit more likely to download games, but women are not too far behind. The gap between men and women downloaders is fairly similar to the gap between men and women gamers overall.

10

And, although teens might be hooked on digital-everything, older millennials and parents are actually more likely to be downloaders.

11

All of these console owners tend to have Netflix subscriptions, and they use their cable’s video on demand about equally. But downloaders – along with older millennials and parents – are big on spending their entertainment dollars at home, so not only are they buying games digitally, they’re also subscribing to more digital platforms like Amazon, Hulu, and HBO Go.

12

Compared to non-downloaders, gamers who buy games digitally spend 15-20% more on last-gen games for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 overall. And they spend 30-40% more on games for current gen consoles.

13

Even though most still prefer physical copies, gamers admit that they’re personally driving this shift toward digital forward. Almost no one says that they expect to be downloading FEWER games in the future.

14

A majority of both downloaders and non-downloaders all agree that digital distribution is the direction that we’re headed in for video game purchasing.

15

Downloaders are more likely to say they’re pleased that digital downloading is the future of gaming, but even they are not 100% ready. Non-downloaders still mostly think that downloading is the inevitable future, but they’re more likely to say they aren’t happy about that.

16

This is true regardless of what group you look at. Males and females, teens and adults all prefer physical copies. So do those who pay to subscribe to premium tiers like Xbox Live Gold and PlayStation Plus. Even downloaders prefer physical copies over digital when it comes down to it.

17

The act of having a physical disc feels more real and as a result tangible value becomes intangible value. Physicality creates a perception of more value; having something tangible is important on its own. But also, down the road, it becomes a form of currency.

18

Those two forms of value – the tangible use of games as currency, and the intangible feeling of ownership, make up the main reasons why gamers keep purchasing physical rather than digital. The other side of physical purchasing is mostly made up of a sense of security: people fear that they will be prevented from keeping their purchases because of hard drive space, consoles crashing, or gaming companies changing the rules.

19

20
212223

Gamers are actually very satisfied with the functional experience of downloading. Aside from storage space, the tech is not a problem.

24

They personally feel that not having to interact with store employees, along with not even having to go to the store, is one of the advantages of downloading over buying physical copies.

26

Virtually everyone wins except for the physical retailers. Gamers are optimistic that they will benefit from a digital shift in the long run, and they expect brick-and-mortar stores to be the only ones who really suffer.

In the world of movies, the retailers played a part in encouraging the digital shift along. Big-box stores promoted DVDs and Blu-Rays as loss-leaders, with heavy markdowns and those big boxes of random DVDs to dig through. This helped make the physical product seem less valuable, and consumers placed less premium on owning the discs, which primed the market for a digital shift.

That’s not likely to happen in the gaming world. Games are sold with a comparatively higher volume out of gaming-specialty stores rather than big-box stores, and gaming-specific retailers are unlikely to turn their main product into a loss leader by cutting down the base price.

27

And what do respondents think about the long run for downloading games?

29

Or, instead of downloading full games, consumers are open to the gaming industry taking a fully different route and following directly after the footsteps of movies and music, to offer something like a streaming service membership. This is still in its infancy, but services like PlayStation Now are trying to redefine digital gaming with streaming possibilities. And gamers are definitely open to that.

In fact, a monthly subscription is more appealing than a future console with all digital downloads… with the exception of one that makes games cost less overall.

While some gamers note that the file size and the need for zero lag will be a hurdle to overcome for streaming games, they like the idea especially because it overcomes the fear of getting stuck with a dud that you can’t return or sell back.

3032

For more information on MFour’s mobile solutions, click on the solutions tab at the top, or fill out the form below.

Contact Us

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
News | Blog | Events
30minuteLOI-mobilesurveys

30 Minute Mobile Surveys? Yes, Here’s How.

 

Want 30+ Minute Mobile LOI’s?
“You’ll Have to Do Better Than This.”

Mobile Friendly

On our native app, incidence and completion rates on 20-30 minute mobile surveys have been consistent at 25% response and 90% plus completion.

Researchers have questioned how we’ve achieved those numbers. Well, the answer rests in the format because in the end, “it’s all about the user experience.” It’s actually a pretty simple proposition, if it’s a “clunky experience” respondents abandon their survey, if it’s fluid they finish.

In the early days of any new methodology, there’s confusion about the best implementation techniques, with many people using similar terms to describe very different methods of conducting research.

Our platform application is native, which means technology is built directly into the phone, allowing respondents to engage in surveys built for their device, take pictures, record video and receive push notifications directly onto their phones. That means that respondents aren’t dependent upon a cell signal or wifi because entire surveys are cached on a respondent’s phone.

To demonstrate, we tested and compared the response rates from three separate mobile formats: Native App, Mobile Web and Mobile Friendly. See below:

Mobile Survey Drop Off Rates

Source: 2,139 surveys, 713 on each platform. Each survey ranges between 200 – 1,500 responses. Surveys conducted March 2014 – December 2014.

As you can see, we had a 5% drop off on our native app compared with 25% for mobile optimized and 70% for mobile friendly.

When you move to mobile, run your own comparison and you’ll see that native apps provide a better experience for users, increase completion rates and get you better data for your clients. If you would like more information about the benefits of going native, fill out the contact us form below or give us a call.

Contact Us

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.