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Study Shows 82% Support for Wearing Green on St. Patrick’s Day

 

 

St Patricks Day clover 900x300

 

With all due respect to Kermit the Frog, America disagrees with his melancholy take on the color green – especially on St. Patrick’s Day. The Sesame Street character lamented in a wistful song that “it’s not easy being green.” But a pre-St. Paddy’s Day mobile survey of 1,200 Americans reveals near-unanimity on green being a positive force, even if there’s substantial disagreement about exactly which warm feelings green represents.

  • 82.1% of respondents said they have “very positive” (42.8%) or “positive” (39.3%) associations with the color green.
  • Among those identifying as Irish American, 90% gave green the thumbs up, with 54% choosing “very positive” and 36% picking “positive.”
  • None of the study’s Irish American respondents considered green in a negative light, and only 1% of all respondents picked “negative” or “very negative.”
  • The dominant emotions respondents reported feeling about green were joy (38.2%), excitement (36.9%), calm (34.4%) and inspiration (28.3%). “Fear” and “sadness” each were mentioned by just 1% of our panel. “Disgust” had 2.6% support – perhaps with Dr. Seuss’s “green eggs and ham” to blame. The strong support for both excitement and calm attests to green’s power as an all-purpose aid to positive feelings. Love, trust, and anticipation were other positive emotions registering support, with each mentioned by 12.8% to 15.1% of respondents.
  • Panelists also strongly associated green with money (26.8%) and nature or recycling (23.9%). But the leading connection they drew from a list of ten possibilities not having to do with emotions was to St. Patrick’s Day (35.2%).
  • Given their high regard for the color green, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that 82% of respondents said they plan to wear it Friday to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. 9% were unsure, and 9% said they won’t be donning anything green. Among Irish Americans, 95% said they’ll be wearing green, and just 3% said they wouldn’t.
  • The Irish among us also seem to have the keenest eyes for that lucky green symbol, the four-leaf clover. 61% reported having found one, compared to 48% of non-Irish respondents.

What should businesses make of these findings? Well, our St. Patrick’s Day survey is just for fun, so we won’t make any claims that it has unearthed any serious consumer insights. But you’ve probably noticed that green is MFour’s company color – so we’ve made our bet. Come to think of it, so have Starbucks, Green Giant and Simple Green, among other leading brands. So even from a business perspective, the appeal of green is not mere blarney.

 

Come back tomorrow for another installment from our survey. We’ll look into what people say about how they plan to eat, drink, and be merry on St. Patrick’s Day.